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MediGain Welcomes Brian Holland as Vice President of Operations
Holland has more than 25 years of experience in healthcare revenue cycle management.







management in multiple disciplines, Holland has direct managerial experience in hospital, physician, and SME environments. He has managed many successful revenue cycle and cash acceleration initiatives.

In his current position with MediGain, Holland is responsible for the oversight of the Ambulatory Surgery Center operations, including verification of benefits, billing, collections, customer service, and cash application. He is charged with transforming the ASC Revenue Cycle Division into an industry leader, by improving, among other things, the collections process.

Prior to his current role with MediGain, he worked for Liberty Medical Supply, a division of Express Scripts International, and CCS Medical – both leaders in the specialty pharmaceutical, diabetic, wound care, and DME space. Brian started his career in healthcare at St. Mary’s Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona, and has held director-level positions with HCA, Apria Healthcare, and Mednax (Pediatrix Medical Group). Brian attended the University of Arizona.

“Brian’s lengthy experience in the healthcare field makes him an excellent fit for MediGain,” says MediGain President and CEO Greg Hackney. “He understands the traits necessary for results-oriented leadership, and he shares our mentality for quality and organic growth.”

About MediGain, LLC: MediGain is a global full-service revenue cycle management and healthcare analytics company devoted to improving billing, collections, and outcomes for healthcare providers and the patients they serve. With over 400 employees, MediGain provides solutions for physician groups, provider networks, ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals enabling them to reach their maximum potential through improved operational, financial, and clinical outcomes. For more information on how MediGain can maximize revenue, reduce expenses and allow you to spend more time on providing your patients with quality healthcare, visit http://www.MediGain.com.
MediGain, a medical billing and reimbursement service for physicians, ambulatory surgery centers, and hospitals, welcomes Brian Holland, former Vice President of Revenue Cycle Management for Liberty Medical Supply.

With more than 25 years of experience in healthcare revenue cycle
Quintuplets’ safe arrival creates new family of 7
Babies born at Parkland June 17 in NICU, doing well







regards the event as a milestone, marking the delivery of its third set of quintuplets. The last quintuplets at Parkland were born in June 1998.

For the happy parents, whose infants are all doing well in Parkland’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), it was an overwhelming but long-anticipated event. Santos-Clark spent eight weeks as an inpatient in the antepartum unit of Parkland while physicians supervised her care and prepared for every eventuality to assure as safe a delivery as possible.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), of the 4 million babies born in the U.S. in 2012, the number of quintuplet, sextuplet and other higher order of births in the U.S. was 45, compared to 131,269 twin births, 4,919 triplet and 276 quadruplet births that year. There is approximately a 0.005 percent chance of giving birth to quintuplets.

Planning among the multidisciplinary care team at Parkland for the quints’ arrival began in April. Meetings were held to discuss which operating rooms and delivery rooms would be utilized. On-call lists were established for nursing, physicians, pharmacy and radiology. The care teams for each infant were identified on the day of delivery and wore the corresponding letters (A through E) to the infant they were assigned to.

“Preparation was crucial to make sure we were ready round-the-clock at a moment’s notice for the arrival of five premature infants,” said Myra Wyckoff, MD, neonatologist and Director of Newborn Resuscitation Services at Parkland and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “We practiced and tested everything to ensure that we had the personnel, equipment, supplies and space for all five babies.”

Coincidentally, Dr. Wyckoff was a resident at Parkland in 1998 when the last quintuplets were born at the facility.

A team of UT Southwestern obstetricians who work at Parkland supervised the high-risk pregnancy and carefully monitored the mother. Their goal was to bring the babies as close to full-term as possible.

The staff’s fine-tuned preparations paid off when Santos-Clark’s water broke around 5 a.m. on June 17 and the medical team swung into action.

Father-to-be Rex Clark posted a hasty but excited message on Facebook: “We have babies on the way!! It is also our anniversary today! Send your thoughts, prayers and good energy our way!”

At 9:13 a.m., the first infant (Baby A) was born and her siblings followed at one-minute intervals until 9:17 when Baby E completed the family. Each infant was immediately surrounded by its own team of Parkland specialists – neonatologist, neonatal nurse practitioner, neonatal nurses and NICU respiratory therapist– standing by with warmers, oxygen and other needed equipment.

Born via Cesarean section, each infant had the typical resuscitation for 31-week gestation and all babies were placed on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the delivery room to aid with breathing.

The quintuplet’s names, gender and birth weights:

Baby A is a girl- Vianca Quing, 1310 grams, 2 pounds 14 ounces
Baby B is a girl- Alessandra Roxy, 850 grams, 1 pound 12 ounces
Baby C is a boy – Perrin Rex, 1050 grams, 2 pounds 5 ounces
Baby D is a boy- Noah Steve, 1010 grams, 2 pounds 4 ounces
Baby E is a girl- Scarlett Jessie, 1330 grams, 2 pounds 15 ounces

Although she is the smallest, little Alessandra Roxy is the “feistiest” of the quints and doesn’t hesitate to make her needs known with insistent cries, Parkland NICU nurses reported. So far, only one unexpected health condition has arisen.

According to Mambarambath A. Jaleel, MD, Medical Director of Parkland’s Neonatal ICU and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at UT Southwestern, “On June 24, a congenital abnormality, malformed bowel, was discovered in Baby Boy C, Perrin Rex, that required surgery that night. He is recovering well from the surgery to repair the condition. The quintuplets are now 14 days old and doing well and gaining weight. All five have had CPAP removed; one is receiving oxygen via a nasal cannula and four are breathing room air.”

In praise of the care team, Dr. Jaleel said, “It took the incredible skill and dedicated efforts of staff from multiple disciplines to make the quintuplet delivery a smooth and well-orchestrated process. Their hard work makes me proud to be a part of this wonderful team.”

Still recovering from the C-section delivery, Santos-Clark said, “We are happy, grateful and relieved. The birth of our quints wouldn’t be possible without all the help of our doctors and the nurses, especially the Parkland NICU team. Thank you! Our babies are in such good hands until we can bring them home.”

“It’s too soon to predict when that may be,” Jennifer Hill, RN, Director of Nursing, Neonatal ICU at Parkland, said. “Typically, if there have not been any complications, we tell parents to expect the babies to be in the NICU until their due date.” The Clark quintuplets due date, had they reached full-term, would have been August 19.

Married in 2012, the Clarks say they dreamed of someday having four kids. But, added Santos-Clark, “We never thought we would have five – and all at the same time!”

When just seven weeks pregnant, the couple were told they were expecting quadruplets, but a sonogram at 16 weeks detected a fifth fetus.

“We were shocked,” said Santos-Clark. “I thought, ‘five babies, how can I handle this?’ I was scared, for myself and my babies.”

But as she read and researched more about quintuplets, Santos-Clark said she gained confidence, especially after meeting other mothers of quintuplets. For the new parents of five, the fears surrounding the high-risk pregnancy and childbirth are melting away as they face the challenges of caring for and raising quintuplets.

“We will just take it a day at time,” the new mother said with a smile.

“We feel very blessed by the great care provided at Parkland,” her husband said. “But we’re still amazed to be the parents of five. It’s just beginning to sink in.”

For more information about Parkland’s NICU, please visit www.parklandhospital.com. For information about donating to the Clark quintuplets, please visit www.clarkquintuplets.blogspot.com
In a matter of four minutes, between 9:13 and 9:17 a.m. on June 17, the Clark family grew from two to seven, when Opalyn (“Ofa”) Santos-Clark, 30, and her husband Rex K. Clark, 27,welcomed three girls and two boys, joining an elite group of parents of quintuplets.

Known as one of the nation’s leading birth centers, Parkland Memorial Hospital also
Methodist Charlton Chief Medical Officer Selected for Health Care Fellows Program
Establishes Methodist Charlton as Key Leader in Dallas Health Care





a year-long program designed to promote the professional development of health care leaders and position them to drive health care innovation. THA’s Leadership Fellows program brings together health care leaders from around the state for a focused study in becoming effective health care advocates for Texas hospitals and the communities they serve. 

“Methodist Charlton is proud of the role we play in serving the health care needs of our community and we are always proactively looking for ways to improve quality, safety, and outcomes for our patients,” says Methodist Charlton President Jonathan S. Davis, FACHE. “We are pleased to have Dr. Vittimberga representing Methodist Charlton in THA’s Fellows program to ensure we are doing even more to influence the future of health care.” 

The THA Leadership Fellows program is designed to grow leaders and equip them to lead community health policy discussions, guide integrations of the latest trends in health care strategy and create an environment that enables the best possible patient care outcomes. Curriculum includes presentations from a diverse group of health care experts with varying perspectives as well as open, active dialogue and debate.

“We are in an age of health care transformation, and as hospital leaders we have to do everything we can to position ourselves at the forefront of health care innovation,” said Ted Shaw, THA president/ CEO. “The THA Fellows program is a chance for us to identify developing thought leaders in their respective health care communities and arm them with even more skills and expertise.”

The entire class list of 2014 THA Leadership Fellows is available at THA’s website.

About THA: Founded in 1930, THA is the leadership organization and principal advocate for the state’s hospitals and health care systems. Based in Austin, THA enhances its members’ abilities to improve accessibility, quality and cost-effectiveness of health care for all Texans. One of the largest hospital associations in the country, THA represents more than 445 of the state’s 584 acute-care hospitals and health care.

About Methodist Health System: Guided by the founding principles of life, learning, and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas. Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers and Medical Groups are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of the United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. Connect with them through Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter at www.methodisthealthsystem.org/socialmedia.
The inaugural class of the Texas Hospital Association’s Leadership Fellows Program was recently announced in Austin and includes a local health care luminary. Frank Vittimberga, MD, chief medical officer at Methodist Charlton Medical Center in Dallas, TX, was one of 24 hospital executives selected for
Arkansas Methodist Medical Center Advances Emergency Care Services with T-System
T-System’s documentation and coding solutions offer significant reimbursement improvement opportunity for hospital.





The hospital is currently a Level IV trauma center as designated by the state and is working toward becoming a Level III trauma center, the highest trauma designation in Northeast Arkansas. After researching the top emergency department solutions vendors, Arkansas Methodist selected T-System based on the company’s reputation, system capabilities and projected reimbursement improvement opportunity.

“We are always looking for ways to improve patient care.  We feel the implementation of these electronic advancements will increase safety, care quality and staff efficiency.  We are excited to continue moving forward in patient-centered care,” said Lana Williams, RN, MSN, CPHQ, chief nursing officer for AMMC.

After being selected as vendor of choice for Arkansas Methodist, T-System completed a 100-chart assessment of previously billed emergency department charts. The assessment identified documentation and coding inadequacies to estimate the five-year return on investment opportunity.

Williams said, “It’s imperative that we’re reimbursed for the services we provide in order to survive in today’s healthcare environment. With T-System, we feel confident we are moving forward with the latest technology to solve these concerns.”

Arkansas Methodist will implement T-System’s complete documentation and coding solution in the fall which will include physician and nurse charting, clinical decision support, CPOE, medical home connectivity and facility E&M and diagnosis coding.

About T-System: T-System Inc. advances the practice of emergency medicine with solutions proven to solve clinical, financial, operational and regulatory challenges for hospitals and urgent care clinics. About 40 percent of the nation’s EDs use T-System solutions to provide an unmatched patient experience. Through gold-standard documentation, revenue cycle management and performance-enhancing solutions, T-System optimizes care delivery from the front door through discharge and beyond. Today, more than 1,900 facilities across all 50 states rely on T-System solutions. For more information, visit www.tsystem.com. Follow @TSystem on Twitter and LinkedIn, or become a T-System fan on Facebook.

About Arkansas Methodist Medical Center: A recognized leader, Arkansas Methodist Medical Center in Paragould provides progressive, compassionate health care to residents throughout Northeast Arkansas and Southeast Missouri. Additional information about AMMC is available at: www.myammc.org.
Arkansas Methodist Medical Center in conjunction with T-System Inc. today announced a new agreement to deliver a complete end-to-end emergency department solution to improve patient safety and reimbursement in order to achieve its mission of being the region’s first choice for healthcare.
Behavioral therapy added to antidepressant treatment reduces likelihood of relapse in pediatric patients









           “Continuation-phase strategies designed to reduce the high rates of relapse in depressed youths have important public health implications, as recurrence of depression is more likely in youths with multiple episodes,” said Dr. Betsy Kennard, Professor of Psychiatry at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study published June 17 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

           Relapse rates in youth with major depressive disorders typically range from 40 percent to 70 percent, said Dr. Kennard, also Director of an outpatient program at Children’s Medical Center called Suicide Prevention and Resilience at Children’s (SPARC).

           In this study, the relapse rate for the group of 75 youth who received behavioral therapy for six months following six weeks of initial treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine, also known as Prozac, was 9 percent. Among the group of 69 youth who received only the drug during this period, 26.5 percent relapsed.

Youth who showed improvement after receiving fluoxetine for an initial six-week treatment period continued in the study, split between the medication-only and therapy plus medication groups. Study participants’ ages ranged from 8-17.

           “Unfortunately, medication alone is not always enough to prevent relapse,” said Dr. Graham Emslie, Chief of the Division of Adolescent and Child Psychiatry, Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at UT Southwestern, and a contributing author of the study. “Identifying novel strategies to prevent future relapses for young people should be a priority. This approach is unique in that treatment was added at a time when the intensity of care is frequently decreasing.”

The type of therapy used in this trial – called Relapse Prevention Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – is an individual psychotherapy treatment with a family component that focuses on reducing residual symptoms, increasing wellness behaviors, and preventing relapse. For six months, the youth in this arm of the trial participated in eight to 11 therapy sessions that were tailored to each child.

“It is also worth noting that youth who received the therapy had lower medication doses, yet had better outcomes than those on higher dosages in the medication management-only group,” said Dr. Kennard.

           Dr. Emslie, holder of the Charles E. and Sarah M. Seay Chair in Child Psychiatry, and Dr. Kennard were co-principal investigators of this single-center clinical trial funded through a National Institute of Mental Health grant.

Other UT Southwestern researchers who contributed to this study were Taryn Mayes, a Faculty Associate in Psychiatry; Dr. Paul Nakonezny, Associate Professor of Clinical Science and Psychiatry; Jessica Jones, psychological associate in Psychiatry; Dr. Aleksandra Foxwell, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; and Jessica King, a research assistant in Psychiatry.

Dr. Emslie receives research support from Eli Lilly, BioMarin, Somerset, Duke University, Forest Laboratories, Valeant, GlaxoSmithKline, and Mylan; is a consultant for Allergan, Biobehavioral Diagnostics Company, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, INC Research, Lundbeck, Merck, Pfizer, Seaside Therapeutics, Shire, Texas Department of State Health Services, University of Miami, and Valeant; and is on the speakers bureau for Forest Laboratories. 

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
Cognitive behavioral therapy in addition to medication improves the long-term success of treatment for children and adolescents suffering from depression, a new UT Southwestern Medical Center study indicates.

Based on the results of a clinical trial conducted at UT Southwestern and Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, depression relapse rates were substantially lower in a group of youth who received both forms of treatment versus medication alone.
Celebrate the 4th, but keep your family safe
Parkland Burn Center promotes fireworks safety







Program Manager at Parkland. “We continue to see people come in each year around the Fourth of July with serious injuries, particularly to their hands, fingers or faces.”

Experts say that many injuries involve sparklers or bottle rockets, items that often are incorrectly considered safe for children.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 8,700 people were treated for fireworks injuries at emergency rooms in 2012. About 5,200 of those injuries occurred during the one-month period between June 22 and July 22. Children less than 15 years of age made up 30 percent of those hurt.

The NFPA also notes that in 2009 fireworks were responsible for 1,300 structure fires.

“If at all possible, families should attend sanctioned fireworks display events,” said Shelli Stephens-Stidham, director of the Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas at Parkland. “These events have spectacular fireworks that can be enjoyed by all members of the family.”

Stephens-Stidham said that if someone still wants to use fireworks, they need to make sure they are in an area where fireworks are legal and follow basic safety precautions such as not letting small children handle them and supervising any older child using them. Never place any part of your body over a fireworks device and step away quickly after lighting them. Never try to re-light or handle a firework device that has malfunctioned. And, keep water nearby in case of fire.

Vanek said that while the number of fireworks injuries seen by the Parkland Burn Center is not high, the injuries are usually severe, sometimes leading to hospitalization, surgery and skin grafts.

“That’s because fireworks and sparklers produce a lot of heat,” Vanek said. “In fact, the tip of a sparkler burns at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough to produce third-degree burns. That’s 300 degrees hotter than the temperature at which glass melts.”

Any fireworks burn should be cooled with water immediately and if the burn is larger than the palm of the hand, seek medical attention immediately. The best way to help someone injured by fireworks is to get them to a burn center as quickly as possible, according to Vanek. If taken to another hospital facility, the patient with a severe burn will need to be transferred to a burn center, delaying treatment. Burn centers are best prepared to handle the kinds of serious, often deep burns caused by fireworks.

“Many people don’t know we have a burn center Parkland, but our Regional Burn Center serves a geographic area of more than 100,000 square miles, including north and east Texas and southern Oklahoma,” Vanek stated. More than 700 pediatric and adult burn patients were admitted to the hospital in 2013 for inpatient care, and the center had more than 3,900 outpatient visits.

Established in 1962, Parkland’s Burn Center is the second largest civilian burn center in the country. The center houses a Burn Intensive Care Unit, a Burn Acute Care Unit and a Burn Care Outpatient Center. For more information about the Burn Center, visit http://www.parklandhospital.com/phhs/burn-unit.aspx
Nothing says Fourth of July like fireworks and sparklers, but specialists at Parkland Memorial Hospital’s Regional Burn Center warn that the potential for severe injuries is especially high during this holiday and they ask that people use extreme caution.

“The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has always urged people to let the professionals handle the fireworks, and that is still very true,” said Sue Vanek, RN, Burn
Two Methodist Health System Nurses Recognized for Excellence





Center, won in the Education and Mentorship category. Methodist Mansfield Medical Center labor and delivery Nurse Manager Amanda Truelove, BSN, RN, RNC-OB, won in the Clinical Nursing, Inpatient, category.  As regional winners, they are among six nurses (one in each category) from the Texas region who will advance to the national award program. Winners of the national award program will be announced in late summer.

Murphy is being honored for her coaching and mentoring of future nurses and for creating an education department from the ground up that has expanded and flourished under her leadership. Among her many accomplishments are the development of a simulation lab on campus and the establishment of an RN Refresher program for nurses who have been away from the clinical setting for more than four years.

Truelove was honored for her work in reducing early elective deliveries and has been recognized nationally for her efforts to decrease harm by encouraging moms to wait until 39 weeks to electively deliver. Through her efforts, the hospital has been able to reduce elective deliveries from 13.3 percent in 2011 to 2.51 percent in 2013. 

“These two nurses are shining examples of the care and compassion shown by all of our nurses, medical staff, and employees,” Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Pamela Stoyanoff says. “We are grateful for their leadership and for their dedication in providing the highest quality of care for patients.” 

Methodist Mansfield’s Med-Day Clinical Coordinator Kalinda Longino, AD, RN, CAPA was also a regional finalist in the Home/ Community and Ambulatory category.

About Methodist Health System: Guided by the founding principles of life, learning and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas. Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. Connect with them through Facebook, YouTube and Twitter at www.methodisthealthsystem.org/socialmedia.
Two Methodist Health System nurses have been named 2014 Texas Nurse.com Nursing Excellence regional award winners.

Lisa Murphy, MS, RN, director of education at Methodist Charlton Medical
Measles – Don’t let it catch you off guard
By Angel Biasatti
Director of Community and Public Relations/Methodist Mansfield Medical Center









“We thought we had nearly eradicated measles in the United States,” says Amber Hyde, MD, a family medical physician on the medical staff at Methodist Mansfield Medical Center. “But measles has reemerged as a public health issue because large numbers of individuals aren’t vaccinated.”

Measles remains the eighth-leading cause of mortality worldwide and the greatest vaccine-preventable cause of death among children. Studies  show that unvaccinated children are 35 times more likely to contract the disease than immunized children.

“When unvaccinated people from the U.S. travel to other countries, they can get measles. And when they return, they can spread the disease,” Dr. Hyde says. 

Dr. Hyde recommends you know the symptoms of measles. “Measles starts with a fever, a cough, a runny nose, and red eyes. Next, a rash of red spots breaks out all over the body,” she says.

“Children with measles may also get an ear infection, or they may have diarrhea. Measles is highly contagious, and it can be serious. It can cause pneumonia and swelling of the brain. Some children even die from measles.”

“Protecting your child from measles is the easiest step you can take,” Dr. Hyde says. “As a parent, make sure your child’s measles vaccine is up to date.”

The vaccination is named “MMR” and is safe and effective. It’s a combination vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles).  

Children require two doses of this vaccine. Usually the first is given at 12 to 15 months of age and the second when the child is 4 to 6 years old. Adults may also receive the vaccine. 

Summer is a great time to practice healthy habits, including getting appropriate vaccinations to best protect you and your family from the measles outbreak. It’s also a great time for an annual physical to get screened for blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, thyroid, and other health conditions. Early detection and prevention is the key for living a long, healthy life.

Pledge yourself to better health today and learn more about your health at MethodistHealthSystem.org.
Measles is making a comeback — even though there’s a vaccine that can help prevent it. During the last five months there have been more than 500 reported cases of measles in the United States. That’s the highest number of cases since 2000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the numbers continue to climb.

Nearly all the outbreaks can be traced to an unvaccinated individual who contracted the disease while traveling abroad. The majority of people who subsequently caught the disease were unvaccinated.
Summer fun also means increased water risks
Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas offers safety tips







based at Parkland Health & Hospital System. “And with kids being out of school, there are more opportunities for them to be unsupervised.”

According to a 2013 report by the Dallas County Child Death Review Team, drowning was the fourth leading cause of death for children under 17, from 2001-2011. It was the leading cause of injury death for children ages 1 to 9. The report also notes that two-thirds of all child drowning deaths in that period occurred in home swimming pools.

Statistics from the Dallas County Medical Examiner’s Office show that between the years 2000 and 2010, the largest number of drowning deaths occurred among children between the ages of 1 and 4.

“One of the most important tips for water safety during the summer or at any time is to never leave children alone in or near a pool,” said Stephens-Stidham. “Accidents can happen in an instant.”

In addition, pools and hot tubs should be surrounded on all sides by sturdy fences at least 4 feet high. They should have self-closing and self-latching gates that cannot be reached by children. Consider installing a pool or gate alarm that can alert you when a gate is opened or someone goes into the water. 

You should also avoid using swimming devices such as “floaties” because they aren’t intended to act as life jackets and they can give children a false sense of security. Keep toys that are not in use out of sight and away from the pool.

While the risk may be greater for children, adults also should use caution around water.

“Always use approved life jackets when boating, for all children and adults. And, never swim alone, whether at a pool or a lifeguarded beach,” Stephens-Stidham said.

Adults also should not drink alcohol when swimming or operating a boat. Alcohol increases the risk of dehydration, can impair your balance and vision, and can affect decision-making skills.

And, learn cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a drowning emergency, call 9-1-1 and begin CPR on the victim immediately.

For additional information about the Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas, call 214.590.4455. Or visit www.injurypreventioncenter.org
Summer may mean more fun in the sun, but as more people try to escape the scorching heat it also brings an increased danger of drowning, especially for children.

“Dallas and Texas have longer periods of warmer temperatures, so there are more opportunities to be in and around water, whether it’s pools, lakes, rivers or coastal water,” said Shelli Stephens-Stidham, director of the Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas,
Sitting too much, not just lack of exercise, is detrimental to cardiovascular health








Sedentary behavior involves low levels of energy expenditure activities such as sitting, driving, watching television, and reading, among others. The findings suggest that sedentary behavior may be an important determinant of cardiorespiratory fitness, independent of exercise.

“Previous studies have reported that sedentary behavior was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes; however, the mechanisms through which this occurs are not completely understood,” said Dr. Jarett Berry, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Clinical Science and senior author of the study. “Our data suggest that sedentary behavior may increase risk through an impact on lower fitness levels, and that avoiding sedentary behavior throughout the day may represent an important companion strategy to improve fitness and health, outside of regular exercise activity.” 

The team of physician-researchers analyzed accelerometer data from men and women between the ages of 12 and 49 with no known history of heart disease, asthma, or stroke, and measured their average daily physical activity and sedentary behavior times. Fitness was estimated using a submaximal treadmill test, and variables were adjusted for gender, age, and body mass index. The findings demonstrate that the negative effect of six hours of sedentary time on fitness levels was similar in magnitude to the benefit of one hour of exercise.

“We also found that when sitting for prolonged periods of time, any movement is good movement, and was also associated with better fitness,” said Dr. Jacquelyn Kulinski, a recent graduate from the UT Southwestern Cardiology Fellowship Training Program and first author of the paper. “So if you are stuck at your desk for a while, shift positions frequently, get up and stretch in the middle of a thought, pace while on a phone call, or even fidget.”

To stay active and combat sedentary behavior, UT Southwestern preventive cardiologists recommend taking short walks during lunch and throughout the day, using a pedometer to track daily steps, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, hosting walking meetings at work, and replacing a standard desk chair with a fitness ball or even a treadmill desk, if possible.

NHANES is an ongoing series of studies conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The database contains health and nutritional data from a diverse population, representative of the U.S. population.

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study include Dr. Amit Khera, Director of the Preventive Cardiology Program and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine; Dr. Sandeep Das, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine; Dr. James de Lemos, Associate Program Director of the Cardiology Fellowship Program and Professor of Internal Medicine; and Colby Ayers, Faculty Associate in the Department of Clinical Science.

This study was funded with support from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the American Heart Association, and an unrestricted endowment provided to Dr. Berry by the Dedman Family.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including five who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
Cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found that sedentary behaviors may lower cardiorespiratory fitness levels. New evidence suggests that two hours of sedentary behavior can be just as harmful as 20 minutes of exercise is beneficial.

The study, published in today’s online edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, examined the association between fitness levels, daily exercise, and sedentary behavior, based on data from 2,223 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).
T-System Names Roger Davis Chief Executive Officer
Industry veteran brings expertise, leadership and vision to drive T-System’s continued growth and innovation in emergency care




Davis will help guide the company’s strategy as they further define new and emerging initiatives that will solve key challenges hospitals face. Davis has built an impressive record of success in a broad range of areas including healthcare system transformation, business process reengineering, performance enhancement, physician practice management, compliance and privacy and business development. 

“My first exposure to healthcare was as an aide in a trauma center over 30 years ago.  Watching the way providers delivered care in that remarkable environment was a formative and significant experience for me,” Davis said. “This is an interesting and dynamic time in healthcare, perhaps the most important in our lifetime.  Unscheduled care, including urgent and emergent care, is at a critical point in the care continuum. With a strong legacy in emergency care and an unmatched team of clinical and healthcare experts, T-System is positioned to help lead through this change. I am excited to be a part of it.”

Davis succeeds John Trzeciak, who has served as interim CEO since February. Trzeciak, operating partner for Francisco Partners, has served on the T-System board of directors since 2010 when Francisco Partners became a financial sponsor for the company. With this change, Trzeciak will resume his former role on the board.

“We considered several outstanding candidates for this position, but it quickly became clear that Roger was the right choice to lead T-System into the future we envision,” said Trzeciak. “Roger’s broad expertise and proven success with setting an ambitious strategy and producing outstanding results make him uniquely qualified to drive T-System’s vision of making a positive and lasting impact on emergency care.”

While at Accenture, Davis led the development and delivery of health system, hospital and physician practice level transformation and performance improvement. Other key leadership positions include executive director at Perot/Dell Services, CEO of 20/20 Healthcare LLC/Viztek LLC and vice president at GE Healthcare/IDX Systems Corp.. On the provider side, Davis was chief business officer at Denver Health and Hospital System as well as chief operating officer for the faculty practice at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio

Davis was an adjunct professor of business administration systems at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. His professional credentials include physician assistant (Class B, emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery), Utah Valley Hospital; CMPE (Certified Management Practice Executive) from the Medical Group Management Association; CCP (Certified Compliance Professional) from the Council of Ethical Organizations/Health Ethics Trust. Davis has a bachelor’s degree in business management/accounting from the University of Texas, San Antonio.

About T-System: T-System Inc. advances the practice of emergency medicine with solutions proven to solve clinical, financial, operational and regulatory challenges for hospitals and urgent care clinics. Approximately 40 percent of the nation's emergency departments leverage T-System solutions to provide an unmatched patient experience. Through gold-standard documentation and coding solutions, T-System optimizes care delivery from the front door through discharge and beyond. Today, more than 1,900 hospitals rely on T-System solutions. For more information, visit www.tsystem.com. Follow @TSystem on Twitter, or become a T-System fan on Facebook.

About Francisco Partners: Francisco Partners is a global private equity firm that specializes in investments in technology companies. Since its launch over a decade ago, FP has raised approximately $7 billion and invested in more than 100 technology companies, making it one of the most active investors in the industry. The firm invests in transaction values ranging from $50 million to over $2 billion, where the firm's deep sub-sector knowledge and operational expertise can help a company realize its full potential. For more information, visit www.franciscopartners.com.
T-System Inc. today announced that Roger Davis, formerly a managing director at Accenture, has been named the company’s new president and chief executive officer, effective immediately.
Parkland dietitian offers tips to prevent food-borne illnesses
Food poisoning shouldn’t stop summer picnics, outdoor fun







To protect yourself, your family and friends from food-borne illnesses during the warm weather months, safe food handling when eating outdoors is critical.

“One of the most important things is to keep cold food cold,” said Sharon Cox, a Registered Dietitian at Parkland. “Cold food should be stored at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below using ice or frozen gel packs to prevent bacteria growth.  Try to limit the number of times you open the cooler. The more times you open it, the more heat can get inside and increase the temperature to a dangerous level.”

In addition to keeping a lid on it, Cox recommends packing beverages in one cooler and perishable food in another. That way, as picnickers open and reopen the beverage cooler to replenish their drinks, perishable foods won’t be exposed to warm outdoor air temperatures.

The key, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is to never let your food remain in the “danger zone” between 40 degrees Fahrenheit and 140 degrees Fahrenheit for more than two hours, or one hour if the outdoor temperature is above 90 degrees.

But while most people know the dangers of consuming food left in the heat, there are times when the meal looks and smells fine. Cox said it’s better to err on the side of caution than risk contracting food poisoning.

“If you aren’t 100 percent sure how long food has been sitting out, especially foods made with mayonnaise or other ingredients that spoil quickly, don’t eat it,” Cox warns. “Why risk ruining a fun day with friends and family by eating food that is not safe?”

Still, if the draw of the potato salad or deviled egg is too much to resist, Cox said to look out for signs of food poisoning including nausea, vomiting or diarrhea, which can start just hours after eating contaminated food. Most often, food poisoning is mild and resolves without treatment. But some cases are severe, requiring hospitalization.

For more information of food-borne illnesses, visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at www.fda.gov. To make an appointment with a Parkland provider, visit www.parklandhospital.com
With summer comes fun in the sun, swimming in the lake and picnics in the park. But while the kids are frolicking on the jungle gym, food-borne bacteria can be wreaking havoc with that special potato salad you made for the family gathering. Dietitians at Parkland Health & Hospital System warn that as food heats up in sweltering summer temperatures, bacteria multiply rapidly.
MyChart use skyrocketing among cancer patients, UT Southwestern study finds










           “This pattern suggests that not only are far more patients using this technology, but also that they are using it more intensively,” Dr. Gerber said.

           These findings, published in the Journal of Oncology Practice, are noteworthy because no prior study has systematically examined the use of electronic patient portals by patients with cancer, even though use of this technology is surging nationwide, creating new terrain in clinical care and doctor-patient relationships.

           The increase in MyChart use reflects the convenience and ease of use perceived by patients.

           Darla Robinson, a 75-year-old Arlington resident with lung cancer, said she uses MyChart to follow up on her appointments with Dr. Gerber and other UT Southwestern doctors. Her husband, Jim, navigates the MyChart pages and types in any messages she wants to send to her caregivers.

           “It’s very efficient for finding your appointments and any information about your tests after you see the doctor,” she said. “It’s no hassle. It’s user friendly.”

           In 2009, Congress allotted $27 billion to support the adoption of Electronic Medical Records. The Department of Health and Human Services began allocating the funding in 2011. UT Southwestern started offering these services years earlier.

           “UT Southwestern made MyChart available for cancer patients in 2007 and, wow, do they use it. Many patients use it, and they use it frequently, with the majority of those patients being over 60,” said Dr. Lee, pointing out that those patients are different from the non-patient demographic, typically younger that uses the internet more heavily than the rest of the general population.

           Dr. Lee, a medical anthropologist, said he will use the study as a baseline to inform his efforts to learn more about how doctor-patient relationships may be changed through increased “meaningful use” of health care technologies, such as the Electronic Medical Record.

           Nearly 6,500 patients at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center enrolled in MyChart from 2007 to 2012 and were included in the study.

“I was struck by the immediacy of the uptake and the volume of use,” Dr. Gerber said. “I suspected that the volume would be high. I did not think that it was going to be multi-fold higher than other patient populations.”

           Use of MyChart was greater among cancer patients than among another other patient groups except for children with life threatening medical conditions, according to the study.

           “We undertook this study because we suspected that the volume of electronic portal use might be greater among patients with cancer than in other populations,” Dr. Gerber said.

           While the study did not directly compare use patterns with non-cancer groups, the average use in the current study was four to eight times greater than has been reported previously in primary care, pediatric, surgical subspecialty, and other populations.

           Dr. Gerber explained that patient use of electronic portals to receive and convey information may have particular implications in cancer care. Laboratory and radiology results may be more likely to represent significant clinical findings, such as disease progression.

           “I think we are still learning how patients understand and use the complex medical data, such as scan reports, that they increasingly receive first-hand electronically,” Dr. Gerber said.

           Furthermore, symptoms reported by patients with cancer may be more likely to represent medical urgencies. Notably, the study found that 30 percent of medical advice requests from patients were sent after clinic hours.

           Other UT Southwestern investigators involved in the research were Dr. Andrew Laccetti, Department of Internal Medicine; Dr. Yang Xie, Beibei Chen and Jingsheng Yan, Department of Clinical Sciences; Samantha Gates, Information Resources; and Jennifer Cai, Academic Information Systems.

The Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center is the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in North Texas and one of just 66 cancer centers in the nation designated by the National Cancer Institute. The center brings innovative cancer care to the region, while fostering groundbreaking basic research that has the potential to improve patient care and prevention of cancer worldwide.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
There has been a sharp increase in the number of cancer patients at UT Southwestern Medical Center using MyChart, the online, interactive service that allows patients to view laboratory and radiology results, communicate with their healthcare providers, schedule appointments, and renew prescriptions.

Over a six-year period, the number of patients actively using MyChart each year increased five-fold, while the number of total logins each year increased more than 10-fold, according to a study by Dr. David Gerber, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, and Dr. Simon J. Craddock Lee, Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences.
UT Southwestern among the “Most Wired,” thanks to technology designed for better patient care










           “Our vision for technology is hard wired into our mission to continually improve patient care, to remain at the forefront of innovative research, and to ensure the next generation of physicians are well prepared for the challenges awaiting them,” said Dr. Bruce Meyer, Executive Vice President for Health System Affairs. “This honor underscores that commitment on all three fronts.”

           UT Southwestern’s latest efforts have focused on expanding technology to enable patient information to be accepted from both internal and external sources, including physicians not associated with UT Southwestern.

           “We added health information systems so that we can get a complete view of the patient,” said Suresh Gunasekaran, Associate Vice President for Health System Information Resources. “This allows us to better manage the health and well-being of patients, helping to prevent medical issues so they don’t need to come to the hospital.”

           An important part of that effort is to continue integrating patient information into electronic health records by making MyChart more easily accessible through smart phone applications. MyChart allows patients to make and track appointments, see test results, communicate with physicians and nurses, and carry medical records easily in their pocket through phone apps. In addition, an increasing number of people are using the apps to help manage healthcare needs for elderly parents and children.

           Videoconferencing also is playing a greater role and will be fundamental to UT Southwestern’s new William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital, scheduled to open in late 2014. Through videoconferencing technology at the hospital, patients will be able to connect with loved ones as well as physicians, whether at UT Southwestern or in their hometowns. Physicians on campus will be able to connect with UTSW doctors at other locations, with pathologists with lab results, and with colleagues around the world. And in keeping with UT Southwestern’s mission to educate current and future generations of physicians, physicians can use the videoconferencing technology to improve learning opportunities for medical students.

           UT Southwestern also is expanding its telemedicine efforts, particularly in areas such as heart care, stroke, and transplant medicine, allowing videoconferencing with patients not in the immediate area and working with physicians to provide the benefit of UT Southwestern’s expertise.

           “We are able to bring the best care at a moment’s notice through the use of technology,” Mr. Gunasekaran said.

           For example, SMART Board technology is integrated throughout the William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital and Zale Lipshy University Hospital. The SMART Board technology allows medical records, x-rays, and other images to be pulled up for medical conferences and case discussions among multidisciplinary teams, while allowing students instant access to the notations being made. That keeps UT Southwestern at the forefront of medical education and ensures graduates are nationally competitive and prepared for the next step in their education.

           Data warehousing – compiling large databases – helps medical researchers identify and investigate trends, determine which new technologies are most effective, and identify those most at risk. Investing in the ability to develop data warehouses is fundamental to UT Southwestern’s distinctive mission as an academic medical center.

           Testing new technologies prior to large rollouts, as well as ensuring data remains secure, are critical elements of UT Southwestern’s technology strategy. The medical center’s information technology development was driven by a 2002 gift from an anonymous donor who challenged the university to develop an IT infrastructure that would augment the quality of care provided to patients. Additional donations ensured that this infrastructure was used to drive patient-centric innovation and improvement.

“We’re always pleased to be able to offer our patients the latest and greatest technologies. But effectively using that leading-edge technology to improve patient care and safety is a compelling commitment at UT Southwestern,” said Dr. Meyer.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
UT Southwestern Medical Center is on the national “Most Wired” hospitals list for a fourth consecutive year, thanks to its use of such technologies as databases to help physicians better identify high-risk patients and tools that keep physicians, nurses, and patients communicating effectively.

The “Most Wired” list is distributed annually by Hospitals & Health Networks magazine, the flagship publication of the American Hospital Association. The magazine evaluates hospitals on information technology in four areas: infrastructure, business/administrative management, clinical quality/safety, and clinical integration.
Texas Health Resources again named Most Wired Health System





Texas Health was recognized as a result of its achievement on the magazine's annual Most Wired Survey, which measures the level of information technology (IT) adoption in U.S. hospitals and health systems. Names of the 2014 Most Wired hospitals and health systems are published in the magazine's July issue and online at www.hhnmag.com<http://www.hhnmag.com/>.

"It's a great honor to have again received Most Wired recognition," said Edward Marx, Texas Health senior vice president and chief information officer. "North Texans benefit daily from the skillful implementation of technology and process by our dedicated IT professionals. Our staff members understand deeply that it's all about the patient."

A major IT initiative at Texas Health is a common electronic health record (EHR). All 14 wholly owned Texas Health Resources hospitals are linked through the electronic health record (EHR) and have the capability to securely share information across the health system.

The computer-based EHR collects, organizes, shares and manages clinical and administrative information, and is used by physicians on the medical staff, nurses and caregivers throughout the hospital and with other linked facilities. Since 2006 Texas Health has invested more than $200 million in its EHR, which contains more than 5.7 million patient records.

Along with its reputation for IT innovation, Texas Health is also known as a national leader in the recruitment and retention of technology professionals. The system was recently recognized by IDG's Computerworld magazine as one of the top 100 workplaces for IT professionals, ranking No. 8 among large companies in the national survey.
Texas Health will be recognized July 20-22 at the Health Forum and American Hospital Association Leadership Summit event in San Diego.

About Texas Health Resources: Texas Health Resources is one of the largest faith-based, nonprofit health systems in the United States. The health system includes 25 acute care and short-stay hospitals that are owned, operated, joint-ventured or affiliated with Texas Health Resources. It includes the Texas Health Presbyterian, Texas Health Arlington Memorial, Texas Health Harris Methodist and Texas Health Huguley Hospitals, Texas Health Physicians Group, outpatient facilities, behavioral health and home health, preventive and fitness services, and an organization for medical research and education.

For more information about Texas Health Resources, call 1-877-THR-WELL, or visit TexasHealth.org<http://www.texashealth.org/homepage.cfm>.
Texas Health Resources has been named by Hospital & Health Networks magazine as one of the nation's "Most Wired" health care systems for the 14th time in 16 years.
Cook Children’s Ranks in 7 Specialties in U.S. News & World Report’s 2014-15 Best Children’s Hospitals





Cook Children’s ranked #35 in Pediatrics: Cancer, #46 in Pediatrics: Cardiology and Heart Surgery, #28 in Pediatrics: Diabetes and Endocrinology, #38 in Pediatrics:
Gastroenterology and GI Surgery, #49 in Pediatrics: Nephrology, #37 in Pediatrics: Neurology and Neurosurgery, and #28 in Pediatrics: Pulmonology.

The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings highlight U.S. News’s top 50 U.S. pediatric facilities in cancer, cardiology & heart surgery, diabetes & endocrinology, gastroenterology & GI surgery, neonatology, nephrology, neurology & neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology. Eighty-nine hospitals ranked in at least one specialty, based on a combination of clinical data and reputation with pediatric specialists.

“What an honor it is to work side by side with exceptional physicians, nurses and staff who embrace the opportunity to improve health and virtually change the lives of children and their families,” said Rick W. Merrill, President and CEO, Cook Children’s Health Care System.

U.S. News introduced the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings in 2007 to help families of sick children find the best medical care available. The rankings open the door to an array of detailed information about each hospital’s performance.

Five-sixths of each hospital’s score relied on patient outcomes and the care-related resources each hospital makes available. To gather clinical data, U.S. News sent a clinical questionnaire to 183 pediatric hospitals. The remaining one-sixth of the score derived from a survey of 450 pediatric specialists and subspecialists in each specialty over three years.

The 4,500 physicians were asked where they would send the sickest children in their specialty, setting aside location and expense.

“Every Best Children’s Hospital deserves high praise,” said U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. “We know how important it is to parents to have confidence in pediatric centers that show dedication and expertise in caring for a child facing a lifethreatening, rare or demanding illness.”

Survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure volume and much more can be viewed on http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings and will be published in the U.S. News “Best Hospitals 2015” guidebook, which will be available in August.
U.S. News & World Report has ranked Cook Children’s in 7 specialties in the new 2014-15 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.
Outdoor workers especially vulnerable to harsh Texas heat
Parkland provides tips to avoid heat-related accidents, illnesses

                             




A combination of high humidity and temperatures in the ‘90s can have the same effect as triple digit days. That, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is why during summer workers exposed to extreme heat or work in hot environments can easily fall victim to heat-related accidents or injuries. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational illnesses and injuries, heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps or heat-related rashes. Since 2010, Parkland Memorial Hospital has seen more than 130 patients with heat-related diagnoses in its emergency department.

“There are a lot of professions where workers are at risk for injuries that directly correspond to the heat,” said Alexander Eastman, MD, Parkland’s Interim Trauma Medical Director. “Topping the list are outdoor workers including police officers, firefighters, farmers, landscapers and those in construction, but it’s just as hard for people working in engineering boiler rooms, bakeries or in factories.”

Heat exhaustion occurs when people are exposed to high temperatures, especially when combined with strenuous physical activity and humidity, and when the body loses fluids and becomes dehydrated. When heat exhaustion elevates, it may result in heat stroke, a life-threatening medical condition occurring when the body’s cooling system, which is controlled by the brain, stops working. The resulting high body temperature causes damage to internal organs, including the brain, and could result in death.

But it’s not just illnesses that occur from extreme heat. So, too, do injuries.

“How many times have you gone from an air conditioned building to the heat outside and your glasses have fogged up? How many times have you almost dropped what you were holding because your hands were sweaty, or the item you were picking up was sweaty,” Dr. Eastman said. “Now combine that with potential dizziness from the extreme heat and it’s a recipe for disaster. A trip on stairs or a curb could result in a trip to the emergency room.

Although critical for outdoor workers, it’s important that everyone know the symptoms of heat-related illnesses, especially heat stroke which is the most serious heat-related disorder. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the sweating mechanism fails, and the body is unable to cool down. When heat stroke occurs, body temperature can rise to 106 degrees Fahrenheit or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not given.

Dr. Eastman offers the following steps to treat a worker with suspected heat stroke:

Call 911 and notify their supervisor
Move the sick worker to a cool shaded area
Cool the worker with methods such as:
Soaking their clothes with water
Spraying, sponging or showering them with water
Fanning their body

“The heat in Texas is a serious threat and it’s something that it shouldn’t be taken lightly,” Dr. Eastman added.

For additional information, visit www.parklandhospital.com.
Each year Dallas residents swelter through more than a dozen days of temperatures in the triple digits. And while many look to the summer of 1980 as an extreme heat event with 42 consecutive 100-degree Fahrenheit days, Parkland Health & Hospital System physicians warn that heat exhaustion can be deadly even if temperatures don’t hit the century mark.
U.S. News Regional Rankings Feature Five Texas Health Resources Hospitals





"This recognition is about much more than rankings; it speaks to the quality care we deliver and represents the hard work and dedication of physicians, nurses and hospital leadership across our health care system," said Douglas D. Hawthorne<http://www.texashealth.org/douglas-hawthorne>, FACHE, CEO of Texas Health Resources. "We're honored that our hospitals have been recognized as they deliver each day on our mission of improving the health of the people in the communities we serve."

Texas Health hospitals ranked in the U.S. News listing are:

  *   Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth<http://www.texashealth.org/fortworth> - ranked No. 3 in the DFW Metroplex.  Listed as high-performing in cancer; diabetes and endocrinology; ear, nose and throat; gastroenterology and GI surgery; geriatrics; gynecology; nephrology; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopedics; pulmonology; and urology.

  *   Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas<http://www.texashealth.org/dallas> - ranked No. 5 in the DFW Metroplex. Listed as high-performing in diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, orthopedics and urology.

  *   Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano<http://www.texashealth.org/plano> - ranked No. 8 in the DFW Metroplex.  Listed as high-performing in gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics and orthopedics.

  *   Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital<http://www.texashealth.org/arlington> - ranked No. 12 (tie) in the DFW Metroplex. Listed as high-performing in gastroenterology and GI surgery.

  *   Texas Health Huguley Hospital Fort Worth South<http://www.texashealth.org/Huguley> - ranked No. 12 (tie) in the DFW Metroplex. Listed as high-performing in neurology and neurosurgery.

Compared against hospitals statewide, the five Texas Health hospitals ranked highly: Texas Health Fort Worth ranked No.9; Texas Health Dallas ranked No. 15; Texas Health Plano ranked No. 25; and  Texas Health Arlington Memorial and Texas Health Huguley tied at No. 37.

U.S. News publishes "Best Hospitals" to help guide patients who need a high level of care because they face particularly difficult surgery, a challenging condition or extra risk because of age or multiple health problems, according to the magazine. Objective measures such as patient survival and safety data, adequacy of nurse staffing levels and other data largely determined the rankings in most specialties.

A national advocate for transparency and accountability in health care safety and quality, Texas Health on April 30 published its "Quality and Safety Report to the Community: A Transparent Report Card from Texas Health Resources." Texas Health is the first health system in Texas and one of only a few in the U.S. that is publicly posting quality and safety data based on independent, nationally recognized clinical indicators. Go to www.TexasHealth.org/Quality-Reports<http://www.texashealth.org/Quality-Report> to view the report.

About Texas Health Resources: Texas Health Resources is one of the largest faith-based, nonprofit health systems in the United States. The health system includes 25 acute care and short-stay hospitals that are owned, operated, joint-ventured or affiliated with Texas Health Resources. It includes the Texas Health Presbyterian, Texas Health Arlington Memorial, Texas Health Harris Methodist and Texas Health Huguley Hospitals, Texas Health Physicians Group, outpatient facilities, behavioral health and home health, preventive and fitness services, and an organization for medical research and education.

For more information about Texas Health Resources, call 1-877-THR-WELL, or visit TexasHealth.org<http://www.texashealth.org/homepage.cfm>.
U.S. News & World Report has ranked five Texas Health Resources<http://www.texashealth.org/homepage.cfm> hospitals among the best in the Dallas-Fort Worth area in the 2014 Best Hospitals metro-area rankings.
Texas Health Dallas achieves Primary Stroke Center recertification






Certification is based on an evaluation of standards of best practice, implementation of clinical practice guidelines and performance measurement activities such as door-to-needle times for the administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator (t-PA), a clot-busting injection used to treat stroke patients. 

“In terms of treatment, every minute counts when a patient arrives with symptoms of a stroke so giving this drug as soon as possible is a priority,” said Dr. Samir Shah, medical director of the stroke center at Texas Health Dallas. “This greatly increases the chance of a good outcome after a stroke.”

He added that The Joint Commission standards for 2014 require that 50 percent of patients receive this medication in less than 60 minutes after arrival. As of 2013, Texas Health Dallas has reached this goal and beyond with a total of 66 percent of our patients receiving the t-PA dose in this timeframe.

“This speaks volumes for our stroke program and the quality of care we’re providing to our patients,” said Latoya Basden, stroke program coordinator at Texas Health Dallas. “Our staff’s level of commitment to this program is outstanding. I see them give it their best each and every day.”

To learn more about the treatment, signs and symptoms of stroke, visit www.texashealth.org/stroke .

About Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas: Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas is an 898-bed acute care hospital and recognized clinical program leader, having provided compassionate care to the residents of Dallas and surrounding communities since 1966. US News and World Report has ranked Texas Health Dallas among the nation’s best hospitals in digestive disorders, orthopedics, and neurology and neurosurgery. An affiliate of the faith-based, nonprofit Texas Health Resources system, Texas Health Dallas has approximately 4,000 employees and an active medical staff of more than 1,000 physicians. For more information, call 1-877-THR-WELL, or visit www.TexasHealth.org.
Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas has once again been recertified as a Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission, the nation’s oldest and largest health care accrediting body. First certified in 2010, Texas Health Dallas takes part in the survey process every two years.
Original Texas Health Dallas physician retires
Dr. Marvin Gerard delivered more than 5,000 infants during his career





delivered the first baby at the newly constructed Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. Since then, he has seen a great deal of medical firsts and been an integral part of generations of families in the North Texas community. In addition, he delivered the first set of twins and performed the first C-section at the hospital.

“I’ve seen my patients go from age 18 to 65 and delivered their children, grandchildren and some great-grandchildren,” said Dr. Gerard, who celebrated his retirement last month at Texas Health Dallas.

He estimates delivering more than 5,000 infants during his career and has seen developments in some of the most crucial areas of medicine. He says one of the most astounding has been the advances in care for premature babies.

“He’s been a physician of firsts and was adaptable to so many changes that took place in his 54 years of practicing medicine,” said Dr. Eugene Hunt, chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Texas Health Dallas. “In fact, Dr. Gerard was one of the first physicians to achieve efficiency with the Electronic Health Record.”

Though he’s not quite sure of his retirement plans just yet, Dr. Gerard does know he wants to stay busy.
“I’ve been busy my entire career and I don’t plan on slowing down,” he added. “This has truly been a great work experience and I really couldn’t have done it without all of the hard working labor and delivery nurses.”

About Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas: Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas is an 898-bed acute care hospital and recognized clinical program leader, having provided compassionate care to the residents of Dallas and surrounding communities since 1966. US News and World Report has ranked Texas Health Dallas among the nation’s best hospitals in digestive disorders, orthopedics, and neurology and neurosurgery. An affiliate of the faith-based, nonprofit Texas Health Resources system, Texas Health Dallas has approximately 4,000 employees and an active medical staff of more than 1,000 physicians. For more information, call 1-877-THR-WELL, or visit www.TexasHealth.org.
In 1966, cesarean sections (C-sections) were not routinely performed, anesthesia was not yet readily available in labor & delivery units, and Dr. Marvin Gerard, OB/GYN on the medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas,
Parkland physician offers top 12 sun safety tips
Children and adults at risk from UV radiation







in the U.S. It’s important to begin educating our children about sun safety at an early age.”

July is UV Safety Month and a good time to remember that ultraviolet (UV) light wreaks havoc with our skin over time, eventually resulting in wrinkles and age spots on our faces, hands and arms, as well as causing skin cancers. Sun exposure can lead to pre-cancerous (actinic keratosis) and cancerous skin lesions, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 3.5 million skin cancers are diagnosed annually and one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. One person dies of melanoma every 57 minutes, and the incidence of skin cancer in young people, even children, is rising.

“Protecting your skin is an important way to protect your health,” said Dr. Persaud. “Reducing exposure is crucial, because nothing can completely undo sun damage. Parents should protect their children’s skin and make sunscreen part of their daily routine. And it’s never too late to begin, even for older adults.”

Here are 12 tips that Dr. Persaud says can reduce risk of sun damage and skin cancer in children and adults alike:

Sunscreen – use a broad-spectrum product that protects against both UVA and UVB radiation, with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or greater. Apply it at least 30 minutes before sun exposure.
Limit outdoor activities during peak UV radiation hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Wear a hat with a 4” brim all around to protect neck, ears, eyes, forehead, scalp and nose.
Wear long-sleeved shirt, long pants or skirt to cover as much skin as possible. Tightly woven fabrics in dark colors provide more protection than light colors in loosely woven fabrics.
Apply cosmetics and lip protectors with SPF 15 or higher to help protect your skin year-round.
Protect your eyes by wearing contact lenses with UV protection and wraparound sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of UVA and UVB radiation.
Ask your pharmacist if medications you’re taking, such as antibiotics, increase your skin’s sensitivity to the sun.
If you’re swimming, reapply sunscreen regularly. Sand, cement and water reflect UV rays, increasing the intensity of exposure.
Be especially cautious about your children’s sun exposure. Apply sunscreen regularly, dress kids in protective clothing and hat and limit their time outdoors during peak UV hours. Babies’ delicate skin is particularly vulnerable. Teach your children at an early age to beware of overexposure to the sun.
Avoid man-made sources of UV radiation, like tanning beds and sun lamps.
Watch out for UV radiation in winter, too. Snow is highly reflective and people engaged in winter sports can get blistering sunburns if their skin isn’t protected.
Perform regular skin self-exams and consult with a physician if you notice any new growths or changes in existing growths.

For information about health services available at Parkland, visit www.parklandhospital.com. For information about skin cancer, visit www.cancer.org
If some is good, is more better? Not when it comes to sun exposure, says Parkland Health & Hospital System pediatrician Donna Persaud, MD.

“Texans love sunshine, but ultraviolet rays do not love our skin,” said Dr. Persaud, chief of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine for Parkland Community Oriented Primary Care. “Sun exposure is the number one cause of skin cancer, the most common form of cancer
OFFICIALS BREAK GROUND ON TEXAS REHABILITATION HOSPITAL OF ARLINGTON, A JOINT VENTURE WITH TEXAS HEALTH RESOURCES, METHODIST HEALTH SYSTEM AND CENTERRE HEALTHCAREInnovative project will serve patients recovering from strokes, brain and spinal-cord injuries, amputations, complex orthopedic injuries, and other conditions






Texas Health Resources and Methodist Health System, in partnership with Nashville, Tenn.-based Centerre Healthcare, are building the 40-bed freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospital at 900 W. Arbrook near Matlock Rd. and I-20 in Arlington, and it is scheduled to open in June 2015. Earl Swensson Associates, Inc. is the architectural and design firm on the project, and TS Bryne is the general contractor.

“We are thrilled to expand the two partnerships we currently have with such outstanding, high quality organizations as Texas Health Resources and Methodist Health System, by creating this collaborative effort, and expect this to be as successful as both the Methodist Rehabilitation Hospital and Texas Rehabilitation Hospital of Fort Worth,” said Centerre Healthcare CEO Patrick Foster.

Strategically located between Texas Health Arlington Memorial and Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, the new facility will employ approximately 150 people and bring more jobs and high-quality compassionate care to the community.

Patients suffering from strokes, brain and spinal-cord injuries, amputations, complex orthopedic injuries, and other conditions will be cared for at the hospital. The new facility will allow both Texas Health and Methodist to significantly expand their current services, both in capacity and capability, enhancing the scope of service and patient care for rehab services.

The hospital has been designed to promote recuperation outside the traditional hospital setting and incorporates many unique features, including:

·         Brain-injury unit with monitored rooms, specialized beds, patient lifts and dedicated therapy space and dining area

Dedicated stroke unit with specialized equipment
Gymnasiums featuring high-tech therapy devices and treatments
Specially equipped rooms for bariatric patients
Special apartment where patients and families can practice daily living tasks
Private, family-friendly rooms with sleeper chairs
Pet therapy and other recreational programs
Outdoor healing garden and walking trail to assist in rehabilitation

“The new hospital will allow us to provide quality, cost-effective inpatient rehabilitation services to more patients within Arlington and will further augment the already strong relationships among our organizations,” said Kirk King, president, Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital. “Aligning our acute care hospitals with the new rehabilitation hospital strengthens our ability to coordinate patient care across the continuum of healthcare and improve patient outcomes.”

“Texas Rehabilitation Hospital of Arlington will serve as an important transitional service for our patients’ continued rehabilitation and recovery,” said John Phillips, president of Methodist Mansfield Medical Center. “This facility will allow us to greatly expand services to the North Texas communities we serve and is perfectly aligned with our mission to provide compassionate, quality care.”

About Centerre Healthcare Corporation: A national provider of inpatient acute rehabilitation services, dedicated solely to partnering with medical centers to complement their healthcare continuum through joint development and operation of acute rehabilitation hospitals and units. Modern Healthcare named Centerre as the fastest growing hospital company in the United States in 2012. Centerre Healthcare facilities rank among the top inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) in the IRF database of Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMR); a ranking which provides a measure of the company’s quality clinical outcomes. Centerre has been named for five consecutive years in the annual ranking of the 5,000 fastest-growing private companies in America by Inc. magazine. For more about Centerre, visit centerrehc.com.

About Texas Health Resources: Texas Health Resources is one of the largest faith-based, nonprofit health systems in the United States. The health system includes 25 acute-care and short-stay hospitals that are owned, operated, joint-ventured or affiliated with Texas Health Resources. It includes the Texas Health Presbyterian, Texas Health Arlington Memorial, Texas Health Harris Methodist and Texas Health Huguley Hospitals, Texas Health Physicians Group, outpatient facilities, behavioral health and home health, preventive and fitness services, and an organization for medical research and education. For more information about Texas Health Resources, call 1-877-THR-WELL, or visit TexasHealth.org.

About Methodist Health System: Guided by the founding principles of life, learning and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas. Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Midlothian Health Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at methodisthealthsystem.org. Connect with them through Facebook, YouTube and Twitter at methodisthealthsystem.org/socialmedia.
Texas Rehabilitation Hospital of Arlington is one step closer to becoming a reality, as workers started turning dirt this month during an informal groundbreaking ceremony. Officials also shared an artist’s rendering with the project team and the public.
UT Southwestern molecular biology researcher selected for American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Merck Award







           Dr. Chen, who holds the George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science, is a pioneer in deciphering the mechanisms of cell signaling, inflammation, and innate immunity – the body’s first, generalized response to infection. 

           “I am extremely honored that the discoveries from our laboratory are being recognized by our scientific colleagues. I’m grateful for the hard work and dedication of the talented people in the lab and the strong support from UT Southwestern,” said Dr. Chen, who is also a member of the Center for Genetics of Host Defense.

           Early in his career, Dr. Chen uncovered a new, unexpected role for ubiquitin, a small protein, showing that it activates proteins important in immune regulation and other essential cellular functions. In subsequent work, he found that the cell’s energy-producing machines, the mitochondria, contribute to the body’s immune response and he identified MAVS, a mitochondrial protein essential for immune defense against many RNA viruses such as influenza, West Nile and hepatitis C. More recently, Dr. Chen discovered a new pathway called the cGAS pathway, which activates the immune system in response to microbial and self DNA.

           “We are delighted to see Dr. Chen receive this very special recognition of his enormously important discoveries that have advanced understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of cell response to viral infections,” said Dr. Daniel K. Podolsky, President of UT Southwestern and holder of the Philip O’Bryan Montgomery, Jr., M.D. Distinguished Presidential Chair in Academic Administration and the Doris and Bryan Wildenthal Distinguished Chair in Medical Science.

           Dr. Chen will present his award lecture, “Enemy within – immune and autoimmune responses to cytosolic DNA and RNA,” at next year’s annual ASBMB meeting in Boston as part of the honors.

“The Merck Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is one of its most coveted prizes. Past winners constitute a ‘who’s who’ in the field of biomedical research,” said Dr. Steven McKnight, Chairman of Biochemistry and holder of the Distinguished Chair in Basic Biomedical Research and The Sam G. Winstead and F. Andrew Bell Distinguished Chair in Biochemistry.

Earlier this year, Dr. Chen was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), one of the highest honors in American science. UT Southwestern has 21 NAS members on its faculty, placing it among the group of academic medical centers with the most NAS members. In 2012, Dr. Chen received the NAS Award in Molecular Biology.

In May, Dr. Chen was inducted into The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST). In 2007, Dr. Chen received TAMEST’s Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Science, and, in 2005, the Robert A. Welch Foundation Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
Dr. Zhijian “James” Chen, Professor of Molecular Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named the 2015 recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) Merck Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology.
Methodist Mansfield Medical Center Offers Mansfield ISD Athletes UIL Athletic Physicals and Echocardiograms






The hospital will also offer free optional echocardiogram screenings at Methodist Mansfield, located at 2700 E. Broad Street in Mansfield. An echocardiogram is a test in which ultrasound is used to examine the heart to help detect abnormalities and/or other cardiovascular conditions that may affect student athletes.

The sports physicals and echocardiogram screenings will be performed by volunteer nurses, allied health professionals, and independently practicing physicians from Methodist Mansfield.  Sports echos will be led by Alan Taylor, MD, cardiologist on the medial staff at Methodist Mansfield. Dr. Darin Charles, MD, and Jeff McDaniel, MD, will lead the team of physicians in performing the sports physicals.

“This is an incredible opportunity for our student athletes to have a quality physical exam,” said Mansfield ISD Athletic Director Debbie Weems. “The generous donations of time and equipment mean many of our students will have access to comprehensive tests.”

“Our goal is to provide a quality UIL physical exam to ensure all of our athletes can compete safely,” said MISD Athletic Trainer Eric White.  

Parents of middle school and high school student athletes in Mansfield ISD who wish to participate in the echocardiogram screening must complete a medical history questionnaire and sign medical releases prior to the screening. The forms are available from MISD athletic directors or on the website www.mansfieldisd.org. Echocardiogram screenings will be offered on a first come/first served basis and will be conducted by appointment only by calling 1-877-637-4297. Parents must accompany their teens during this painless non-invasive test.  

The sports physical is not intended to replace a student’s regular physical exam with their primary care physician, but it will meet UIL requirements to medically clear students before they can participate in any organized sports activity. The echocardiogram procedure is a screening exam and does not rule out all heart-related causes of illness.  

About Methodist Health System: Guided by the founding principles of life, learning and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas. Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. Connect with them through Facebook, YouTube and Twitter at www.methodisthealthsystem.org/socialmedia.
Mansfield Independent School District Athletic Department is partnering with Methodist Mansfield Medical Center to offer $20 sports physicals to some 5,000 middle school and high school student athletes.  Physicals will take place Saturday, Aug. 2, from 9 a.m. to noon at Mansfield High School, 3001 E. Broad Street in Mansfield.
UT Southwestern researcher selected as Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences









Dr. Nam, Southwestern Medical Foundation Scholar in Biomedical Research, is elucidating how non-coding RNAs work and is identifying new avenues by which to develop therapeutics.

“Only about 2 percent of the transcribed genome is estimated to code for protein. We want to understand how the rest of the transcribed genome, the non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), work,” she said. “We are particularly interested in ncRNAs that are involved in the regulation of gene expression and that impacts human disease, such as microRNAs, which can play important roles in the development of various human diseases including cancer.

“Knowing how microRNAs work and how they are regulated will provide the framework for us to discover ways to intervene and identify new therapies,” said Dr. Nam, who uses a wide variety of experimental approaches to study microRNAs.

“Dr. Nam is an outstanding scientist and is most deserving of this award,” said Dr. W. Lee Kraus, Director of the Cecil H. and Ida Green Center for Reproductive Biology Sciences, and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. “Her research on the mechanisms of microRNA processing, which has led to surprising new insights into the regulation and function of these important molecules, has important implications for stem cells and cancer.”

The Cecil H. and Ida Green Center for Reproductive Biology Sciences, where Dr. Nam’s laboratory is based, promotes and supports cutting-edge, integrative and collaborative basic research in female reproductive biology, with a focus on signaling, gene regulation, and genome function.

Dr. Nam, a Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas Junior Faculty Recruitment Awardee and a UT Southwestern Endowed Scholars Awardee, is a member of UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center, the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in North Texas and one of just 66 NCI-designated cancer centers in the nation.

Dr. Nam obtained her bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University, and completed fellowships at Harvard Medical School. She joins a community of more than 500 Pew scholars whose ranks include multiple recipients of Nobel Prizes, Lasker Awards, and MacArthur Fellowships. Pew Scholars are selected based on their proven creativity by a national advisory committee composed of eminent scientists.

“Scientific breakthroughs often come from seemingly unlikely origins, which is why it’s so important to give young scientists the freedom and the support they need to pursue their most creative ideas,” said advisory committee Chairman Dr. Craig C. Mello, a 1995 Pew scholar and a 2006 Nobel laureate in physiology or medicine. “It is our privilege to help these outstanding investigators pursue new research paths and work with peers across disciplines in order to advance biomedical science and ultimately benefit human health.”

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
Dr. Yunsun Nam, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Biophysics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, is among 22 early-career researchers named Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

The Pew Scholars Program supports top U.S. scientists at the assistant professor level by providing funding to tackle some of the world’s most pressing health problems at the start of their independent research careers.
Students recognize community needs through photography
Injury Prevention Center at Parkland joins forces to create safer community






Working with Dallas-area photographers, the students receive photography training and then put their newly-acquired skills to use to tell a story and to identify safety issues. The project also includes a session on how to work with city officials to spark policy and social changes by engaging, informing and organizing community members to take action and explore possible solutions. Jared Porter, digital media specialist at Parkland Health & Hospital System, provided instruction to students on ways to use social media to affect change, promote their passions and share their talents.

The 5-week course will end with a reception, photographic presentation and display and walking tour of the neighborhood for city officials, parents and community stakeholders. The event will take place at 1:30 p.m., Thursday, July 24 at Sam Tasby Middle School, 7001 Fair Oaks Ave., Dallas, 75231.

“Through this project, students better recognize issues and concerns they have in their community regarding safety and safe routes to school,” said Shelli Stephens-Stidham, director of the Injury Prevention Center.

“The PHOTOVOICE Project teaches students that they have both a voice and a responsibility to make needed changes for the community,” added Martha Stowe, executive director, Vickery Meadow Youth Development Foundation.

In 1994, area health, government and business leaders established the Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas to create an injury- and violence-free Dallas. The center is jointly funded by Parkland, Baylor Healthcare System, Texas Health Resources and Methodist Hospitals of Dallas. In 1996, the Injury Prevention Center led the effort to have Dallas designated by the World Health Organization as the first U.S. city to receive international Safe Communities certification.
For the fourth year, the Injury Prevention Center (IPC) of Greater Dallas is using photography through the PHOTOVOICE Project to teach students in Vickery Meadow about the importance of safety in their neighborhood. PHOTOVOICE is a joint collaboration between the Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas housed at Parkland and the Vickery Meadow Youth Development Foundation.
Texas Health Vice President Receives National Award for Health Information Management Leadership









“We are thrilled, but not surprised, to see Diann receive this significant national recognition,” said Elaine Anderson, senior vice president and chief compliance officer of Texas Health Resources. “Diann and her skilled team of information management professionals are absolutely critical in helping our system serve North Texans’ health care needs.”

As Texas Health’s leader for health information management (HIM) services, Smith directs the centralizing and standardizing of HIM practices across the 25-hospital system, one of the nation’s largest faith-based, nonprofit health care systems. She manages functions such as coding, release of information, data integrity, analysis of documentation, medical record delinquency, records management and transcription services.

“My work allows our clinicians to have the right information on the right patient so they can provide the best care possible,” said Smith.

A native of Golinda, Texas, near Waco, Smith received her bachelor’s degree in health information management from Texas Woman’s University and master’s degree in human relations and business from Amberton University. She is a Registered Health Information Administrator and is Certified in Healthcare Privacy, as well as a Fellow of the American Health Information Management Association.

A Texas Health employee for 14 years, she served as director of HIM at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth before assuming her present position.

“I feel blessed to be part of an organization that leads by example while demonstrating compassion and integrity in all that we do,” said Smith. “I vividly recall orientation on my first day at work. One of the leaders stated, ‘We do the right thing because it’s the right thing to do.’ That resonated with me.”

Smith will receive the Triumph Award for Leadership at AHIMA’s Annual Convention in San Diego on Sept. 29.

“I’m honored to be recognized by my peers for doing something I love,” said Smith.

About Texas Health Resources: Texas Health Resources is one of the largest faith-based, nonprofit health systems in the United States. The health system includes 25 acute care and short-stay hospitals that are owned, operated, joint-ventured or affiliated with Texas Health Resources. It includes the Texas Health Presbyterian, Texas Health Arlington Memorial and Texas Health Harris Methodist and Texas Health Huguley Hospitals, Texas Health Physicians Group, outpatient facilities, behavioral health and home health, preventive and fitness services, and an organization for medical research and education.

For more information about Texas Health Resources, call 1-877-THR-WELL, or visit TexasHealth.org.
The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) has selected Diann Smith, vice president of health information management services at Texas Health Resources, to receive its Triumph Award for Leadership.

The AHIMA Triumph Awards recognize professionals who have made a significant difference in health information management, according to the organization. The awards are AHIMA’s highest recognition of excellence, dedication and service. Smith is one of three Leadership Award honorees for 2014.
Parkland offers school immunizations at ‘Walk-in Wednesday’ clinics






Through its “Walk-in Wednesday” program, Parkland is making it easier for parents to get their children the immunizations required by the state. On any Wednesday, beginning July 23, parents can bring children to one of Parkland’s Community Oriented Primary Care (COPC) health centers or Youth & Family Centers for their vaccinations without  an appointment. Parkland’s neighborhood health centers are located throughout Dallas County.

Immunizations during Walk-in-Wednesdays will be available from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parents can still walk in with their children for vaccinations on other days, but appointments are recommended. To schedule an appointment for your child at a COPC health center, please call 214.266.4000. To schedule an appointment at a Youth & Family Center, please call 214.266.1257.

“Vaccines don’t just protect individuals; they protect entire communities. By receiving a vaccination, you are helping to protect those around you from communicable diseases,” said Jessica Hernandez, Parkland’s Senior Vice President of Operations, COPC.

And, parents should not wait until the last minute.

“We offer Walk-in Wednesdays to make it easier for parents to get their children’s immunizations well in advance of the first day of school,” Hernandez said. “But the health centers are ready to assist parents on other days as well.”

Children in Texas are required to have been vaccinated for nine communicable diseases before entering kindergarten through 12th grades.  The required vaccinations are: Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis; Polio; Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR); Hepatitis B; Varicella; Meningococcal; and Hepatitis A. Children in day care must also be vaccinated. And don’t forget about older children – especially those in 7th and 8th grades – who may need new or booster shots. Parkland recommends and provides the HPV (human papilloma vaccine) for this age group, as well.

Parkland accepts Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP and most major insurance plans. If you do not have insurance, Parkland can provide financial screening to determine if patients qualify for financial assistance.

To find the Parkland COPC health center nearest you, please visit www.parklandhospital.com
With August just around the corner, it’s time for most families to start making back-to-school plans. Topping that list, Parkland Health & Hospital System officials say, is ensuring your child’s immunizations are up to date. If not, your little one may not be allowed to start school on time.
Methodist Mansfield Medical Center Board Chair Honored Statewide





Mansfield Medical Center advisory board, member of the Methodist Health System board of directors, and Methodist Health System Foundation board of trustees

Established in 1972, the Founders’ Award is presented annually to a distinguished health care trustee with an exemplary record of leadership, dedication, and excellence in health care governance and the community. The 49 recipients of the award have exemplified the group’s dedication to the health care field.

“Randall Canedy has a notable record of service to the Methodist Health System. His work exemplifies the dedication and commitment of health care trustees from throughout the state,” said Stacy G. Cantu, CAE, THT president and chief executive officer. “Like many of our dedicated trustees, Canedy brings a wealth of knowledge and experience from a 30-year career in banking, providing powerful perspective and leadership in economically challenged times.”

Hospital officials recognized Canedy’s role in various hospital initiatives and programs, including the Read to Me program which involves donating new children’s books to every child born at the hospital to champion literacy and a lifelong love of reading. Canedy was also instrumental in leading a labor and delivery capital campaign to expand women’s services, raising more than $830,000. Canedy has played an active role in supporting numerous health initiatives in Mansfield including the Methodist Mansfield Mad Dash For Cash 5K, a hospital walking trail for the community, and serving as a leading proponent of health care advocacy initiatives. In all, Canedy has devoted more than 2,000 hours each year, along with money and resources, to improve the health and wellness in Mansfield. 

“Randall is a leader who brings more than just know-how and professional experience to the board,” said John Phillips, FACHE, president of Methodist Mansfield Medical Center. “He also brings impassioned commitment to improving the lives of patients as well as citizens throughout the community.”

About Methodist Health System: Guided by the founding principles of life, learning and compassion, Methodist Health System (Methodist) provides quality, integrated care to improve and save the lives of individuals and families throughout North Texas. Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, and Methodist Family Health Centers are part of the nonprofit Methodist Health System, which is affiliated by covenant with the North Texas Conference of The United Methodist Church. Additional information is available at www.methodisthealthsystem.org. Connect with them through Facebook, YouTube and Twitter at www.methodisthealthsystem.org/socialmedia.
Texas Healthcare Trustees, (THT) recognized Randall Canedy, President Frost Bank – Mansfield, July 25 at the THT 2014 Healthcare Governance Conference in Dallas with the 2014 Founders’ Award, the organization’s highest honor. Canedy was honored for his service as chair of the Methodist
UT Southwestern researchers uncover new brain pathways for understanding Type 2 diabetes and obesity








glucose metabolism and energy expenditure, said senior author Dr. Joel Elmquist, Director of the Division of Hypothalamic Research, and Professor of Internal Medicine, Pharmacology, and Psychiatry.

“A number of previous studies have demonstrated that MC4Rs are key regulators of energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis, but the key neurons required to regulate these responses were unclear,” said Dr. Elmquist, who holds the Carl H. Westcott Distinguished Chair in Medical Research, and the Maclin Family Distinguished Professorship in Medical Science, in Honor of Dr. Roy A. Brinkley. “In the current study, we found that expression of these receptors by neurons that control the sympathetic nervous system, seem to be key regulators of metabolism. In particular, these cells regulate blood glucose levels and the ability of white fat to become ‘brown or beige’ fat.”

Using mouse models, the team of researchers, including co-first authors Dr. Eric Berglund, Assistant Professor in the Advanced Imaging Research Center and Pharmacology, and Dr. Tiemin Liu, a postdoctoral research fellow in Internal Medicine, deleted MC4Rs in neurons controlling the sympathetic nervous system. This manipulation lowered energy expenditure and subsequently caused obesity and diabetes in the mice. The finding demonstrates that MC4Rs are required to regulate glucose metabolism, energy expenditure, and body weight, including thermogenic responses to diet and exposure to cold. Understanding this pathway in greater detail may be a key to identifying the exact processes in which type 2 diabetes and obesity are developed independently of each other.

In 2006, Dr. Elmquist collaborated with Dr. Brad Lowell and his team at Harvard Medical School to discover that MC4Rs in other brain regions control food intake but not energy expenditure.

The American Diabetes Association lists Type 2 diabetes as the most common form of diabetes. The disease is characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by the body’s lack of insulin or inability to use insulin efficiently, and obesity is one of the most common causes. Future studies by Dr.  Elmquist’s team will examine how melanocortin receptors may lead to the “beiging” of white adipose tissue, a process that converts white adipose to energy-burning brown adipose tissue.

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study include Dr. Philipp Scherer, Director of the Touchstone Center for Diabetes Research, Professor of Internal Medicine and Cell Biology, and holder of the Gifford O. Touchstone, Jr. and Randolph G. Touchstone Distinguished Chair in Diabetes Research; Dr. Kevin Williams, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine; Dr. Syann Lee, Instructor of Internal Medicine; Dr. Jong-Woo Sohn, postdoctoral research fellow; and Charlotte Lee, senior research scientist.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Heart Association.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified neural pathways that increase understanding of how the brain regulates body weight, energy expenditure, and blood glucose levels – a discovery that can lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

The study, published in Nature Neuroscience, found that melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4Rs) expressed by neurons that control the autonomic nervous system are key in regulating
Parkland expert offers tips on how to prevent eye injuries
Eye Injury Prevention Month promotes eye safety






“There are some basic steps you can take to help reduce eye injuries,” said Mirage Shah, OD, FAAO, optometrist at the Ophthalmology Clinic at Parkland Health & Hospital System. “One of the most important of these is to wear protective safety glasses when doing housework, yard work or playing sports.”

That simple measure can go a long way toward preventing all kinds of eye injuries. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, nearly one million people lose some degree of vision from preventable eye injury every year. An estimated 44 percent of the injuries occur in the home, and more than 40 percent are related to sports or recreational activities.

“Eye injuries occur from many different sources, such as household chemicals splashing, flying fragments and fumes in the workshop, fireworks, baseballs, tennis balls and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) sunlight” Dr. Shah said.

Even mundane household chores can pose hazards. Dr. Shah recalled a 42-year-old patient whose eye was scratched by a tree branch as he was trimming a hedge. The man developed a fungal infection of the cornea and needed extensive treatment.

“He permanently lost a little bit of vision in that eye, and it could have been prevented by wearing safety glasses,” he said.

The Vision Council also notes that just as UV exposure can burn and damage the skin, it can also harm unprotected eyes. Extended UV exposure has been linked to eye cancer and increased risk for cataracts. Protection from UV exposure is especially important for children. But a survey by the Vision Council reports that less than half of parents make sure their children wear sunglasses when outside.  And, almost a third of adults never or rarely use sunglasses when outside.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology also recommends that parents only buy only age-appropriate toys for their children, avoiding toys with projectiles. Parents should look for items labeled with “ASTM,” which means it meets standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials. Protective eyewear for household or workshop use should be marked with “ASNI Z87.1,” which means the glasses, goggles or face shield meets the requirements of the American Standards Institute.

“If someone does suffer an eye injury, they should contact their local eye doctor, or go to the nearest emergency room immediately,” Dr. Shah said. “If chemicals are involved, immediately rinse your eyes, preferably with sterile saline solution or an eye rinse, for several minutes and visit an eye care specialist.” Dr. Shah added that rinsing with water is a less desirable option due to possible contaminants in the water and recommended having sterile saline solution or eye rinse in your home for possible emergencies.

For additional information on preventing eye injuries visit http://www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/living/eye-injuries/preventing.cfm
Virtually every daily activity requires eye sight, from reading to working to sports and communicating with others. Yet, eye experts note that too often people forget to take measures that can prevent injuries. July’s observance of Eye Injury Prevention Month offers a great opportunity to think about eye safety.
UT Southwestern cancer researchers identify irreversible inhibitor for KRAS gene mutation involved in lung, colon, and pancreatic cancers











Researchers have unsuccessfully tried to develop a drug to inhibit K-Ras for some 30 years.

“RAS proteins including KRAS have not been ‘druggable’ for many decades despite a lot of effort from academia and industry,” said senior author Dr. Kenneth Westover, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology and Biochemistry, and a member of UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center.

“We are exploring irreversible inhibitors as a solution, which we believe may pave the way for the development of KRAS-targeted compounds with therapeutic potential and perhaps compounds that target other RAS family proteins involved in cancer,” Dr. Westover said.

Dr. Westover works as both a clinician as a member of the Lung Radiation Oncology Team at the Simmons Cancer Center, and as a researcher. The Westover laboratory investigates the molecular basis of cancer with an eye toward developing compounds that perturb cancer biology, and therefore have potential to become therapies. Dr. Westover’s lab has been particularly targeting KRAS because this gene is the most commonly mutated oncogene in cancer.

Building on previous work, Dr. Westover and fellow investigators used a technique called X-ray crystallography to determine what happens when SML is added to KRAS carrying the G12C mutation, a hallmark of tobacco-associated lung cancer and present in 25,000 of the new cases of lung cancer in the U.S. annually.

Researchers found that SML irreversibly binds to mutated KRAS, making the KRAS G12C inactive. SML competes with molecules that KRAS naturally binds to, called GTP and GDP, and is not removable, even when GTP and GDP are present at very high levels. This attribute is what makes SML an irreversible inhibitor – neither GDP nor GTP are able to knock it off and take its place.

The researchers then used a technique called mass spectrometry to determine that SML is not only irreversible, but selective – binding only to KRAS and not the roughly 100 other members of the RAS protein family that have very similar structures.

“We believe SML may be the first irreversible and selective inhibitor of KRAS,” said Dr. Westover, who was recruited to UT Southwestern with funds from the state-funded Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas. “As a next step, we are improving the SML compound to facilitate studies involving living cancer cells, and eventually animals and humans.”

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved include Dr. Zhe Chen, Assistant Professor of Biophysics, and postdoctoral researchers Dr. John Hunter, first author, Dr. Deepak Gurbani, and Dr. Martin Carrasco, in Radiation Oncology and Biochemistry.

The research, published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was supported by funds from the Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas, and The Welch Foundation.

UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center is the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in North Texas and one of just 66 NCI-designated cancer centers in the nation. The Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center includes 13 major cancer care programs with a focus on treating the whole patient with innovative treatments, while fostering groundbreaking basic research that has the potential to improve patient care and prevention of cancer worldwide. In addition, the Center’s education and training programs support and develop the next generation of cancer researchers and clinicians.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors.

The molecule, SML-8-73-1 (SML), interferes with the KRAS gene, or Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog. The gene produces proteins called K-Ras that influence when cells divide. Mutations in K-Ras can result in normal cells dividing uncontrollably and turning cancerous.  These mutations are particularly found in cancers of the lung, pancreas, and colon. In addition, people who have the mutated gene are less responsive to therapy.
Ten highly cited UT Southwestern researchers among 2014 World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds










community and the field of medicine,” said Dr. David Russell, Vice Provost and Dean of Basic Research, Professor of Molecular Genetics, and holder of the Eugene McDermott Distinguished Chair in Molecular Genetics.

Noted UT Southwestern faculty included in this year’s listing include a Nobel Laureate, four members of the National Academy of Sciences, three members of the Institute of Medicine, three members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and two Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. 

UT Southwestern’s top-cited researchers, based on the category in which they were selected, are:

Biology & Biochemistry

Dr. Daniel Rosenbaum, Assistant Professor of Biophysics and Biochemistry, holder of the Eugene McDermott Scholar in Medical Research, whose research involves G protein-coupled receptors, membrane protein structural biology, and molecular recognition.

Dr. Philipp Scherer, Professor of Internal Medicine and Cell Biology, holder of the Gifford O. Touchstone, Jr. and Randolph G. Touchstone Distinguished Chair in Diabetes Research, whose research involves fat cells, blood vessel formation, insulin-secreting cells, breast cancer, and intracellular protein trafficking.

Dr. Joseph Takahashi, Chairman of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and holder of the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience, whose research involves circadian biology and the discovery of genes that influence behavior.

Clinical Medicine

Dr. Adi Gazdar, Professor of the Nancy B. and Jake L. Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research and Pathology and holder of the W. Ray Wallace Distinguished Chair in Molecular Oncology Research, whose research involves inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, molecular pathogenesis of human cancers especially lung cancers, preneoplastic changes preceding cancer and the role of DNA viruses in human cancers.

Dr. Scott Grundy, Professor of Internal Medicine and holder of the Distinguished Chair in Human Nutrition, whose research involves cholesterol metabolism, dietary fats, drugs affecting lipoprotein metabolism, human genetics, and metabolic syndrome.

Dr. David Johnson, Chairman of Internal Medicine and holder of the Donald W. Seldin Distinguished Chair in Internal Medicine, whose research involves developing new therapies to treat lung cancer.

Dr. Eric Olson, Chairman of Molecular Biology, Director of the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science, and holder of the Pogue Distinguished Chair in Research on Cardiac Birth Defects, the Robert A. Welch Distinguished Chair in Science, and the Annie and Willie Nelson Professorship in Stem Cell Research, whose research involves microRNAs, muscle development, stem cells, and transcriptional regulation.

Immunology

Dr. Bruce Beutler, Nobel Laureate, Regental Professor, Director of the Center for Genetics of Host Defense, Professor of Immunology, and holder of the Raymond and Ellen Willie Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research, in Honor of Laverne and Raymond Willie, Sr., whose research involves identifying the molecular machinery that mammals use to fight infections.

Molecular Biology & Genetics

Dr. Beth Levine, Professor of  Internal Medicine and Microbiology, Director of the Center for Autophagy Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and holder of the Charles Cameron Sprague Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science, whose research involves defining  the role of autophagy in health and disease and how autophagy is regulated at the molecular level.

Psychiatry/Psychology

Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, Professor of Psychiatry and holder of the Betty Jo Hay Distinguished Chair in Mental Health, whose research involves evidence-based psychopharmacology and treatment algorithms in mood disorders, functional brain imaging in major depressive and obsessive-compulsive disorders, and neurobiology and psychopharmacology of depression and bipolar disorder.

“The listings of Highly Cited Researchers feature authors whose published work in their specialty areas has consistently been judged by peers to be of particular significance and utility,” according to the announcement by Reuters.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center: UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to nearly 91,000 hospitalized patients and oversee more than 2 million outpatient visits a year.
Ten UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are among the most highly cited researchers in the U.S., earning them a place on Thomas Reuters’ 2014 list of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds.

Researchers earn the distinction by ranking among the top 1 percent of scientists most cited for their subject field and year of publication between 2002 and 2012.

“These citations by scientific peers underscore the breadth and value of discovery under way at UT Southwestern, as well as the value of our research to the larger scientific